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  • In 1932 Paul Nash wondered “whether it is possible to ‘go modern’ and still ‘be British’”. This, he said, “is a question vexing quite a few people today…the battle lines have been drawn up: internationalism versus an indigenous culture; renovation versus conservatism; the industrial versus the pastoral; the functional versus the futile.” During the 1930s Nash attempted to reconcile the two by developing a distinctively British form of Surrealism where mock monumental objects are set in the landscapes of southern England like as if they were prehistoric megaliths. The objects stand out as gigantic, inexplicable presences and yet are deeply rooted in the landscape. In Mineral Objects they are pieces of bituminous shale called ‘coal money’ from Kimmeridge in Dorset. The shale was easily worked to make simple jewelry and amulets in prehistoric and Roman times and when turned on a lath the discarded pieces were often left with a square hole. These objects, Nash wrote, ‘are dramatic…as symbols of their antiquity, as hallowed remnants of an almost unknown civilization.’
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  • In 1932 Paul Nash wondered “whether it is possible to ‘go modern’ and still ‘be British’”. This, he said, “is a question vexing quite a few people today…the battle lines have been drawn up: internationalism versus an indigenous culture; renovation versus conservatism; the industrial versus the pastoral; the functional versus the futile.” During the 1930s Nash attempted to reconcile the two by developing a distinctively British form of Surrealism where mock monumental objects are set in the landscapes of southern England like as if they were prehistoric megaliths. The objects stand out as gigantic, inexplicable presences and yet are deeply rooted in the landscape. In Mineral Objects they are pieces of bituminous shale called ‘coal money’ from Kimmeridge in Dorset. The shale was easily worked to make simple jewelry and amulets in prehistoric and Roman times and when turned on a lath the discarded pieces were often left with a square hole. These objects, Nash wrote, ‘are dramatic…as symbols of their antiquity, as hallowed remnants of an almost unknown civilization.’
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  • Bibliograpic reference :: A. Bowness, Nash Exhibitions at Both the Redfern Gallery and the Victoria and Albert Museum, Arts Magazine, Vol. 35, May 1961, p. 23, N1 A415 + (A & A)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Andrew Causey, Paul Nash, landscape and the life of objects, Lund Humphries, Farnham ; Burlington, VT, 2013, pp. 108, 109, no. 96, NJ18.N17 C28 2013 (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: James Johnson, Churchill Painting Up for Sale, Scotsman, March 14, 1997, p. 20, Available on Line in Factiva Data Base
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Paul Mellon's Legacy, a passion for British art. [large print labels], Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, 2007, v. 1, N5220 M552 +P381 2007, Mellon Shelf (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Paul Mellon's legacy, a passion for British art. [large print labels], Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, 2007, v. 1, N5220 M552 +P381 2007, Mellon Shelf (YCBA)
  • Dimension height :: 50.2cm
  • Dimension width :: 60.3cm
  • Exhibition :: 2016 Installation YCBA - 201
  • Exhibition :: 20th Century Paintings and Sculpture
  • Exhibition :: Connections
  • Exhibition :: Paul Nash
  • Exhibition :: Revisiting Traditions [BAC 20th century painting & sculpture]
  • Located in :: 201
  • Located in :: Bay N10
  • Located in :: New Haven
  • Located in :: Not on view
  • Located in :: On view
  • Located in :: YCBA, 201, Bay N10
  • Located in :: Yale Center for British Art
  • Object type :: painting
  • Subject Concept :: abstract art
  • Subject Concept :: contrast
  • Subject Concept :: landscape
  • Subject Concept :: shale
  • Subject Concept :: still life
  • Subject Place :: Dorset
  • Subject Place :: England
  • Subject Place :: Kimmeridge
  • Subject Place :: United Kingdom
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  • ...
?:PX_has_credit_line
  • Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Fund
?:label
  • Mineral Objects
?:type