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  • Between 1799 and 1815, the wars with Napoleon made recreational travel on the Continent more or less impossible, with the exception of a period of less than a year following the 1802 Treaty of Amiens. Turner took advantage of the temporary cessation of hostilities to make his first trip to the Continent, spending three months traveling through France and Switzerland and making more than five hundred sketches. On his return, he dismantled two of his sketchbooks and mounted over a hundred of the most highly finished drawings in an album to show prospective patrons. This proved to be an effective strategy, as Turner received numerous commissions for finished watercolors of Alpine views from collectors, including Walter Fawkes, who was to become one of the artist’s closest friends and most supportive patrons, and who owned this drawing. The watercolor has traditionally been identified with one of Turner’s 1803 Royal Academy submissions, entitled “Glacier and Source of the Arveron, Going Up to the Mer de Glace”, but Eric Shanes has recently suggested that the exhibited work was a watercolor formerly owned by Fawkes and now in the National Gallery of Wales, Cardiff (Wilton, “Turner”, 1979, no. 376) and that Turner made the present drawing for Fawkes around 1814. Both watercolors were included in an exhibition Fawkes held at his London house in 1819. Shanes has painstakingly examined the catalogue and contemporary representations of the installation, noting that the Center’s drawing was exhibited as “Mer de Glace, in the Valley of Chamouni, Switzerland”, whereas the Cardiff drawing bore the title “Source de l’Arveron, Valley of Chamouni”. Neither title corresponds exactly to the Royal Academy submission; moreover, the Cardiff drawing, which is smaller and considerably less ambitious in technical terms, seems a less likely candidate for exhibition at the Academy than the spectacular Yale watercolor. In the absence of conclusive documentary evidence, much of this argument depends on technical and stylistic issues. Although Shanes’s suggestion that an 1803 dating for this highly sophisticated watercolor is too early may be persuasive, it is not inconceivable that Turner could have produced it at that moment in his career, and a dating of 1814 seems somewhat late. Shanes’s thesis is extremely thought provoking, however, and merits more detailed discussion than this entry permits.
?:PX_curatorial_comment
  • Between 1799 and 1815, the wars with Napoleon made recreational travel on the Continent more or less impossible, with the exception of a period of less than a year following the 1802 Treaty of Amiens. Turner took advantage of the temporary cessation of hostilities to make his first trip to the Continent, spending three months traveling through France and Switzerland and making more than five hundred sketches. On his return, he dismantled two of his sketchbooks and mounted over a hundred of the most highly finished drawings in an album to show prospective patrons. This proved to be an effective strategy, as Turner received numerous commissions for finished watercolors of Alpine views from collectors, including Walter Fawkes, who was to become one of the artist’s closest friends and most supportive patrons, and who owned this drawing. The watercolor has traditionally been identified with one of Turner’s 1803 Royal Academy submissions, entitled “Glacier and Source of the Arveron, Going Up to the Mer de Glace”, but Eric Shanes has recently suggested that the exhibited work was a watercolor formerly owned by Fawkes and now in the National Gallery of Wales, Cardiff (Wilton, “Turner”, 1979, no. 376) and that Turner made the present drawing for Fawkes around 1814. Both watercolors were included in an exhibition Fawkes held at his London house in 1819. Shanes has painstakingly examined the catalogue and contemporary representations of the installation, noting that the Center’s drawing was exhibited as “Mer de Glace, in the Valley of Chamouni, Switzerland”, whereas the Cardiff drawing bore the title “Source de l’Arveron, Valley of Chamouni”. Neither title corresponds exactly to the Royal Academy submission; moreover, the Cardiff drawing, which is smaller and considerably less ambitious in technical terms, seems a less likely candidate for exhibition at the Academy than the spectacular Yale watercolor. In the absence of conclusive documentary evidence, much of this argument depends on technical and stylistic issues. Although Shanes’s suggestion that an 1803 dating for this highly sophisticated watercolor is too early may be persuasive, it is not inconceivable that Turner could have produced it at that moment in his career, and a dating of 1814 seems somewhat late. Shanes’s thesis is extremely thought provoking, however, and merits more detailed discussion than this entry permits.
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  • Alternate title :: Glacier and Source of the Arveiron, Going Up to the Mer de Glace
  • Bibliograpic reference ::
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Andrew Wilton, The life and work of J.M.W. Turner, Academy Editions, London, 1979, pp.93, 341, No. 365, pl. 90, NJ18 T85 +W577 OVERSIZE (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Architectural space in eighteenth-century Europe, constructing identities and interiors, Ashgate Publishing, Farnham, England Burlington, VT, 2010, pp. 174=75, fig. 9.3, NA2850 A73 2010 (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Christiana Payne, Silent Witnesses Trees in British Art, 1760-1870, Sansom & Co., Bristol, p. 144, fig. 75, NX650.T74 P39 2017 (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Eric Shanes, The life and masterworks of J.M.W. Turner, Parkstone Press, New York, 2008, pp. 118-19, NJ18 T85 S441 2008 + OVERSIZE (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Geoffrey Agnew, Yale's 1700 Mellon Pictures, The Times (London), issue no. 59989, Thursday, April 28, 1977, p. 9, Available Online : Times Digital Archive , Also available on Microfilm : Film An T842 (SML)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: J.M.W. Turner, Tate Publishing, London, 2007, pp. 44, 54, fig. 18, NJ18 T85 A12 2007 + (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: John Baskett, Paul Mellon's legacy, a passion for British art : masterpieces from the Yale Center for British Art, Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, 2007, p. 283, no. 86, pl. 86, N5220 M552 P38 2007 OVERSIZE (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Mahonri Sharp Young, The Mellon Drawings at the Morgan, Apollo, vo. 95, no. 122, April, 1972, p. 334, fig. 9, N1 A54 + (YCBA) , Another copy available in Vertical File - V 2330
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Painting in England 1700-1850, collection of Mr. & Mrs. Paul Mellon., Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA, 1963, p 95, no. 146, ND466 V57 v.1-2 (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Todd Longstaffe-Gowan, Mapping a National Style, topography & landscape at the Yale Center for British Art, Apollo, v. 165, no. 542, April, 2007, p. 58, fig. 9, N1 A54 + (YCBA)
  • Dimension height :: 70.5cm
  • Dimension width :: 104.1cm
  • Exhibition :: An American's Passion for British Art - Paul Mellon's Legacy
  • Exhibition :: English Landscape (Paul Mellon Collection) 1630-1850
  • Exhibition :: Paul Mellon's Legacy : A Passion for British Art
  • Exhibition :: Presences of Nature - British Landscape 1780-1830
  • Exhibition :: The Critique of Reason : Romantic Art, 1760–1860
  • Exhibition :: The Great Age of British Watercolors c.1750 - 1880
  • Exhibition :: Translations - Turner and Printmaking
  • Exhibition :: Turner and the Sublime
  • Exhibition :: Works of Splendor and Imagination - The Exhibition Watercolor 1770-1870
  • Located in :: New Haven
  • Located in :: Not on view
  • Located in :: YCBA, 223B, C 106, Sh-25
  • Located in :: Yale Center for British Art
  • Object type :: drawing
  • Object type :: watercolor
  • Subject Concept :: clouds
  • Subject Concept :: geology
  • Subject Concept :: glacier
  • Subject Concept :: ice
  • Subject Concept :: landscape
  • Subject Concept :: meteorology
  • Subject Concept :: mountains
  • Subject Concept :: river
  • Subject Concept :: science
  • Subject Concept :: sheep
  • Subject Concept :: shepherd
  • Subject Concept :: snake
  • Subject Concept :: snow
  • Subject Concept :: trees
  • Subject Concept :: valley
  • Subject Event :: Grand Tour
  • Subject Place :: Alps
  • Subject Place :: Europe
  • Subject Place :: Mer de Glace (glacier)
  • Subject Place :: Mont Blanc
  • Subject Place :: Switzerland
?:PX_display_wrap
  • ...
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  • Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection
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?:label
  • Mer de Glace, in the Valley of Chamouni, Switzerland
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