PropertyValue
?:P102_has_title
?:P104_is_subject_to
?:P12i_was_present_at
?:P138i_has_representation
is ?:P140_assigned_attribute_to of
?:P1_is_identified_by
?:P24i_changed_ownership_through
?:P2_has_type
?:P30i_custody_transferred_through
?:P39i_was_measured_by
?:P43_has_dimension
?:P45_consists_of
?:P46i_forms_part_of
?:P48_has_preferred_identifier
?:P50_has_current_keeper
?:P52_has_current_owner
?:P55_has_current_location
?:P62_depicts
?:P65_shows_visual_item
?:P70_is_documented_in
?:P70i_is_documented_in
?:PX_curatorial_comment
  • This may well be a drawing of one of the so-called foregrounds in miniature that Gainsborough constructed out of stones, mosses, and mirrors in his Bath studio. He assembled and then sketched these miniature tabletop landscapes as a means of composing the feathery trees, gnarled stumps, rocky outcroppings, and pools of water that appear in his landscapes, portraits, and genre scenes. Gainsborough was also, however, devoted to the practice of drawing the motif directly from nature. The painter Ozias Humphry, a neighbor of Gainsborough’s in Bath, recalled that the two artists would often take afternoon sketching excursions into the countryside (Hayes and Stainton, 1983, p. 9). Whatever the mechanics of the creation of this drawing, it demonstrates a change in style and technique that evolved during his Bath period. Previously, the artist had drawn mostly with pencils. In the 1760s the ever-inventive and experimental Gainsborough began to make mixed-media drawings with watercolor, chalk, oil paint, and gum arabic, among other things. Combining these materials allowed him to achieve dramatic chiaroscuro and texture in his works on paper. Here, he emphasizes the rock in the middle distance, touching it with white paint and a dash of acidic green suggestive of moss or lichen in tone and texture.
?:PX_curatorial_comment
  • This may well be a drawing of one of the so-called foregrounds in miniature that Gainsborough constructed out of stones, mosses, and mirrors in his Bath studio. He assembled and then sketched these miniature tabletop landscapes as a means of composing the feathery trees, gnarled stumps, rocky outcroppings, and pools of water that appear in his landscapes, portraits, and genre scenes. Gainsborough was also, however, devoted to the practice of drawing the motif directly from nature. The painter Ozias Humphry, a neighbor of Gainsborough's in Bath, recalled that the two artists would often take afternoon sketching excursions into the countryside (Hayes and Stainton, 1983., p. 9). Whatever the mechanics of the creation of this drawing, it demonstrates a change in style and technique that evolved during his Bath period. Previously, the artist had drawn mostly with pencils. In the 1760s the ever-inventive and experimental Gainsborough began to make mixed-media drawings with watercolor, chalk, oil paint, and gum arabic, among other things. Combining these materials allowed him to achieve dramatic chiaroscuro and texture in his works on paper. Here, he emphasizes the rock in the middle distance, touching it with white paint and a dash of acidic green suggestive of moss or lichen in tone and texture.
  • This may well be a drawing of one of the so-called foregrounds in miniature that Gainsborough constructed out of stones, mosses, and mirrors in his Bath studio. He assembled and then sketched these miniature tabletop landscapes as a means of composing the feathery trees, gnarled stumps, rocky outcroppings, and pools of water that appear in his landscapes, portraits, and genre scenes. Gainsborough was also, however, devoted to the practice of drawing the motif directly from nature. The painter Ozias Humphry, a neighbor of Gainsborough’s in Bath, recalled that the two artists would often take afternoon sketching excursions into the countryside (Hayes and Stainton, 1983, p. 9). Whatever the mechanics of the creation of this drawing, it demonstrates a change in style and technique that evolved during his Bath period. Previously, the artist had drawn mostly with pencils. In the 1760s the ever-inventive and experimental Gainsborough began to make mixed-media drawings with watercolor, chalk, oil paint, and gum arabic, among other things. Combining these materials allowed him to achieve dramatic chiaroscuro and texture in his works on paper. Here, he emphasizes the rock in the middle distance, touching it with white paint and a dash of acidic green suggestive of moss or lichen in tone and texture.
?:PX_display_wrap
  • Alternate title :: A Bulder in a Stream at the foot of a Tree
  • Alternate title :: Landscape with Rocks and Pool
  • Alternate title :: Study of Rocks and Plants
  • Alternate title :: Study of a Woodland Pool with Rocks and Burdock Leaves
  • Bibliograpic reference :: A loan exhibition of English drawings and watercolours from the collection of Mr and Mrs Paul Mellon of Upperville, Virginia, P. & D. Colnaghi & Co., London, 1964, cat. no. 12, N5247.M385 L62 (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Ann Bermingham, Landscape and ideology, the English rustic tradition, 1740-1860, Thames and Hudson, London, 1987, pp. 337-38, fig. 17, ND1354.4 B47 1987 (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: John Baskett, Paul Mellon's legacy, a passion for British art : masterpieces from the Yale Center for British Art, Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT, 2007, p. 257, no. 36, pl. 36, N5220 M552 P38 2007 OVERSIZE (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: John T. Hayes, Gainsborough drawings, International Exhibitions Foundation, Washington, D.C., 1983, pp. 23, 116-17, no. 48, col. pl. 48, NJ18 G16 H392 (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Malcolm Cormack, Oil on water, oil sketches by British watercolorists, Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, 1986, p. 32, fig. 25, ND467 C67 (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Painting in England 1700-1850, collection of Mr. & Mrs. Paul Mellon., Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA, 1963, p. 62, no. 58, ND466 V57 v.1-2 (YCBA)
  • Bibliograpic reference :: Yale University Art Gallery, English drawings and watercolors, from the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, April 15 - June 20, 1965, New Haven, 1965, cat. no. 12, NC228 Y34 (YCBA)
  • Dimension height :: 22.9cm
  • Dimension width :: 28.9cm
  • Exhibition :: An American's Passion for British Art - Paul Mellon's Legacy
  • Exhibition :: English Drawings and Watercolors from the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon
  • Exhibition :: English Landscape (Paul Mellon Collection) 1630-1850
  • Exhibition :: Gainsborough Drawings - International Exhibitions Foundation
  • Exhibition :: Oil on Water - Oil Sketches by British Watercolorists
  • Exhibition :: Paul Mellon's Legacy : A Passion for British Art
  • Exhibition :: The Line of Beauty : British Drawings and Watercolors of the Eighteenth Century
  • Exhibition :: Thomas Gainsborough (Tate)
  • Located in :: New Haven
  • Located in :: Not on view
  • Located in :: Yale Center for British Art
  • Object type :: drawing
  • Object type :: watercolor
  • Subject Concept :: bark
  • Subject Concept :: boulder
  • Subject Concept :: foliage
  • Subject Concept :: grass
  • Subject Concept :: landscape
  • Subject Concept :: pond
  • Subject Concept :: rock
  • Subject Concept :: stream
  • Subject Concept :: tree
  • Subject Concept :: trees
  • Subject Concept :: water
  • Subject Concept :: woodland
?:PX_display_wrap
  • ...
?:PX_has_credit_line
  • Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection
?:PX_has_main_representation
?:label
  • A Woodland Pool with Rocks and Plants
?:type