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  • Cosway used his signature method of sticking closely to the tone of the ivory support in this portrait of the Earl of Hopetoun (1741-1816). He limited his palette to blue, gray, white, and black, with pink highlights on the cheeks and lips, and the colors were made as transparent as possible before application. They seem to float on the ivory background, which is visible in sections of the countess's gown that are untouched by watercolor or gouache. Although the face is rendered with delicate strokes of paint, Cosway freely applied his signature blue in the background. The Earl and Countess of Hopetoun (1750–1793 were acquainted with the Cosways at least three years before these portrait miniatures were painted. In 1786 their daughter Eliza recorded having seen an “excessively handsome” miniature of the Prince of Wales at the Cosways’ home and studio (“Troubled Life”, 2000, p. 7). What prompted the Hopes to sit for Cosway in 1789, particularly in the somewhat unusual format of a pair of pendant miniature portraits, is not known.
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  • Cosway used his signature method of sticking closely to the tone of the ivory support in this portrait of the Earl of Hopetoun (1741-1816). He limited his palette to blue, gray, white, and black, with pink highlights on the cheeks and lips, and the colors were made as transparent as possible before application. They seem to float on the ivory background, which is visible in sections of the countess's gown that are untouched by watercolor or gouache. Although the face is rendered with delicate strokes of paint, Cosway freely applied his signature blue in the background. The Earl and Countess of Hopetoun (1750–1793 were acquainted with the Cosways at least three years before these portrait miniatures were painted. In 1786 their daughter Eliza recorded having seen an “excessively handsome” miniature of the Prince of Wales at the Cosways’ home and studio (“Troubled Life”, 2000, p. 7). What prompted the Hopes to sit for Cosway in 1789, particularly in the somewhat unusual format of a pair of pendant miniature portraits, is not known.
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  • Alternate title :: James Hope, 3rd Earl of Hopetoun
  • Alternate title :: James Hope, 3rd Earl of Hopetoun (1741-1816)
  • Bibliograpic reference ::
  • Dimension depth :: .3cm
  • Dimension height :: 7.9cm
  • Dimension height :: 9.2cm
  • Dimension width :: 6.0cm
  • Dimension width :: 6.7cm
  • Exhibition :: An American's Passion for British Art - Paul Mellon's Legacy
  • Exhibition :: English Portrait Drawings & Miniatures
  • Exhibition :: Paul Mellon's Legacy : A Passion for British Art
  • Exhibition :: Richard and Maria Cosway - Regency Artists of Taste and Fashion
  • Exhibition :: The Line of Beauty : British Drawings and Watercolors of the Eighteenth Century
  • Located in :: Not on view
  • Located in :: YCBA, 317, Octavo, C1, Sh-7
  • Located in :: Yale Center for British Art
  • Object type :: miniature
  • Object type :: watercolor
  • Subject Concept :: male
  • Subject Concept :: portrait
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  • ...
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  • Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection
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?:label
  • James Hope, 3rd Earl of Hopetoun
  • James Hope, third Earl of Hopetoun
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